Nuclear myth and Malta’s neighbours

 

 

 

published on Saturday March 26, 2011

 

April 26 marks the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuc­lear disaster, which affected 40 per cent of European territory.

Sicilians (but not the Maltese) were then advised on precautions to be observed in order to avoid the effects of airborne radioactive contamination on agricultural produce. In the UK, until very recently, a number of farms were still under observation after having been contaminated through airborne radioactive caesium in 1986. Wild boar hunted in Germany’s forests cannot be consumed. Its food-chain is still contaminated with radioactive caesium, which was dispersed all over Europe as a result of the Chernobyl disaster.

The Fukushima disaster has occurred in efficient and safety-conscious Japan.

Nature has taken over, confirming its supremacy over the risk society; confirming that even the smallest risk is unacceptable in nuclear projects as this exposes nations, ecosystems, economies and whole regions to large-scale disasters.

The myth that nuclear technology is safe has been shattered once more at Fukushima.

In addition to the disasters at Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986), there were also a number of near misses such as that on June 4, 2008 in Krško on the Slovenia/Croatia border. In Krško, leaking coolant water was minutes away from causing a meltdown of the nuclear installation. The leakages of coolant water from nuclear plants in the Tricastin region in France in July 2008 are also of particular significance.

Malta is faced with plans by Italy, Libya, Tunisia and others to generate nuclear energy.

Libya has agreed with France to be provided with a nuclear plant along its coast to carry out seawater desalination. Fortunately, this agreement has so far not materialised. One shudders just thinking on the possibilities which access to nuclear technology in the civil war on Libyan soil could lead to.

The Berlusconi government, ignoring the result of a 1987 Italian referendum, has embarked on a nuclear programme that could lead to the construction and operation of a number of nuclear installations on Italian soil. One of these will be sited in Sicily.

The locality of Palma di Montechiaro has been mentioned as the preferred site although an area near Ragusa is also under consideration. Both Palma di Montechiaro and Ragusa are situated along Sicily’s southern coast and are too close to Malta for comfort. A serious accident there could have an immediate effect on Malta. Moreover, this is the area which was most affected by a 1693 earthquake that caused considerable damage in both Ragusa and Malta.

This contrasts with the declaration last week by Abdelkater Zitouni, leader of Tunisie Verte, the Tunisian Green party, who has called on Tunisia’s transitional government to abandon the 2020 project of a nuclear plant in Tunisia.

What is the Maltese government doing on the matter?

There is no information in the public domain except an article published in Il Sole 24 Ore on July 26, 2008 authored by Federico Rendina and entitled Il Governo Rilancia Sull’Atomo. In a kite-flying exercise during an official visit to Rome by a Maltese delegation, Mr Rendina speculated on the possibilities of placing nuclear reactors for Italy’s use on territories just outside Italian jurisdiction. Malta, Montenegro and Albania were mentioned in this respect. It was unfortunate that the Maltese government only spoke up after being prodded by the Greens in Malta. It had then stated that no discussions on the matter had taken place with the Italian government.

On behalf of the Greens in Malta, since 2008 I have repeatedly insisted on the need to make use of the provisions of the Espoo Convention, which deals with consultation procedures to be followed between countries in Europe whenever issues of transboundary impacts arise. On March 3, 2010 Parliament in Malta approved a resolution to ratify this convention.

The Espoo Convention, the EU Directive on Environmental Impact Assessment and the EU Strategic Environment Assessment Directive establish the right of the Maltese public to be consulted by Italy in the procedures leading to the construction of a nuclear power station, both on the Italian mainland as well as in Sicily. This is definitely not enough.

Various countries are reconsidering their position on nuclear energy as a result of the Fukushima disaster. Italy’s government has started to feel the pressure ahead of a June anti-nuclear referendum championed by Antonio di Pietro and earlier this week temporarily suspended its nuclear programme.

Italy is a region which is seismically active. The devastation caused by the 2009 earthquake in L’Aquila is still imprinted in our memories. The 1908 earthquake at Messina/Reggio Calabria was much worse, the worst ever in Europe. It produced an estimated 13-metre tsunami wave in the central Mediterranean. In Messina alone, over 120,000 lost their lives.

Faced with government silence, I think the matter should be taken up by Maltese environmental NGOs in partnership with their Italian counterparts. Public opinion needs to be sensitised on the dangers that lie ahead as Fukushima is a warning we cannot afford to ignore. 

other posts on Nuclear Issues on this blog

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F’Krško evitat inċident nukleari

                                                    Konferenza tal-Aħbarijiet dwar l-inċident

 

Nhar l-Erbgħa 4 ta’ Ġunju 2008 f’Krško ġewwa s-Slovenja, għaxar kilometri mill-fruntiera mal-Croatia, kien evitat inċident nukleari.

 

L-impjant nukleari li jiġġenera 700 Megawatt ta’ elettriku u jissuplixxi dan kemm lis-Slovenja kif ukoll lill-Croatia inbena mill-kumpanija Amerikan Westinghouse bejn l-1974 u l-1984.

 

X’ġara ?

 

Ħareġ ilma li jintuża biex ikessaħ l-impjant nukleari (cooling water). Dan għandu importanza kbira fit-teknoloġija użata. Fil-fatt immedjatament l-impjant ingħalaq. Li kieku dan ma seħħx il-problema kienet tista’ tikber tali li jekk it-temperatura tibqa’ togħla jkun hemm kollass totali (melting down) tal-impjant kif ġara f’Chernobyl  fl-1986 u kif kważi ġara fi Three Mile Island fl-1979.

 

Iktar tard l-Erbgħa fil-għaxija ġie kkonfermat illi l-ebda materjal radjuattiv ma ħareġ il-barra mill-impjant u b’hekk ma ġie kkawżat l-ebda dannu ambjentali.

 

L-inċident ikkawża allarm kbir tant li ġie attivat is-sistema ta’ allarm uffiċjali tal-Unjoni Ewropea magħrufa bħala ECURIE (European Community Urgent Radiological Information Exchange) sistema li ma kienitx ġiet attivata meta kien hemm inċidenti serji fl-impjanti nukleari ta’ Försmark fl-Iżvezja u Brunsbüttel fil-Ġermanja. Il-pubbliku, kif qalet il-Federazzjoni tal-Partiti l-Ħodor fil-Parlament Ewropew huwa anzjuż u attent ħafna minħabba r-riskji bla bżonn li l-enerġija nukleari qed tesponi lill-komunita’ għalihom.